"Bear in mind that the wonderful things you learn in your schools are the work of many generations, produced by enthusiastic effort and infinite labor in every country of the world. All this is put into your hands as your inheritance in order that you may receive it, honor it, add to it, and one day faithfully hand it to your children. Thus do we mortals achieve immortality in the permanent things which we create in common." - Albert Einstein

Wednesday, April 17, 2013

Top 100 Universities in Asia

Taiwan is the second best-represented country in the 2013 Asia University Rankings, with 17 universities in the top 100, according to rankings published by the Times Higher Education magazine yesterday. 
Japan is the best-represented nation, with 22 universities listed, while Taiwan has 17 institutions, followed by mainland China and South Korea with 15 and 14 institutions included in the rankings, respectively. 
National Taiwan University is 14th in the table, while National Tsing Hua University is ranked 27th, followed by National Chiao Tung University in 32nd place. 
Phil Baty, editor of Times Higher Education Rankings, was quoted in the magazine and said in an interview with The China Post that these rankings show Taiwan's strength is its depth...

...Japan's University of Tokyo tops the 2013 Asia university rankings, followed by the National University of Singapore. South Korea takes three of the top 10 places while Hong Kong has two top 10 representatives. China's top-ranked institution is Peking University in fourth place.

There is no higher institution of learning from the Philippines included in the Top 100 list. Malaysia has 2, Thailand has 3 and so does the small state of Singapore. Taiwan, having 17 institutions in the list, is really impressive especially with its relatively smaller size of 23 million people.

In order to appreciate what these rankings are about, it is important to look at the methodology used. Universities are primarily ranked worldwide with scholarly research as an important criterion. In fact, in the Times Higher Education Rankings, research (publication output and citations) accounts for more than half.

Flor Lacanilao has shared the following in this blog about a year ago:
For instance, in 2005, after nearly 50 years of our S&T agency (DOST) and nearly 30 years of our science academy (NAST), the total scientific publications of the Philippines were only 178. Whereas those of tiny Singapore, smaller Taiwan, and South Korea were, respectively, over 3,600, 10,800, and 16,400 (Data from WK Cummings, courtesy of Dr. Lawrence M. Liao, Filipino scientist at Hiroshima University).
Without publications in peer-reviewed journals, it should not be surprising why one would not find a school in the Philippines in the list of top 100 Asian Universities.

For the complete list,
visit http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/world-university-rankings/2012-13/regional-ranking/region/asia

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