"Bear in mind that the wonderful things you learn in your schools are the work of many generations, produced by enthusiastic effort and infinite labor in every country of the world. All this is put into your hands as your inheritance in order that you may receive it, honor it, add to it, and one day faithfully hand it to your children. Thus do we mortals achieve immortality in the permanent things which we create in common." - Albert Einstein

Sunday, September 1, 2013

Through the Eyes of Students and Teachers: Visible Learning

Back in 2008, John Hattie, Professor of Education and Director of the Visible Learning Labs, University of Auckland, New Zealand, published a book entitled, "Visible Learning: A Synthesis of Over 800 Meta-Analyses Relating to Achievement". The publisher describes this book as follows:
This unique and ground-breaking book is the result of 15 years research and synthesises over 800 meta-analyses on the influences on achievement in school-aged students. It builds a story about the power of teachers, feedback, and a model of learning and understanding. The research involves many millions of students and represents the largest ever evidence based research into what actually works in schools to improve learning. Areas covered include the influence of the student, home, school, curricula, teacher, and teaching strategies. A model of teaching and learning is developed based on the notion of visible teaching and visible learning. 
A major message is that what works best for students is similar to what works best for teachers – an attention to setting challenging learning intentions, being clear about what success means, and an attention to learning strategies for developing conceptual understanding about what teachers and students know and understand. 
Although the current evidence based fad has turned into a debate about test scores, this book is about using evidence to build and defend a model of teaching and learning. A major contribution is a fascinating benchmark/dashboard for comparing many innovations in teaching and schools.
The book presents a quantitative analysis of what works and what does not work in education. The main measure is "effect size", which can be extracted using either one of the following definitions:

Copied from Hattie's presentation
A large positive effect size is therefore associated with something that works. One interesting result that Hattie discovered comes after grouping these interventions according to two different views of what teaching should be:
Copied from Hattie's presentation
Copied from Hattie's presentation
Under the "Facilitator" column, some are the recognizable sound bites of education reformers. While the items under "Activator" sound traditional. So, here are the scores:

Copied from Hattie's presentation
50,000 individual studies involving hundreds of millions of students provided this vision.






1 comment:

  1. these kids can play children education games too for the betterment of their education.thanks for sharing the post here with us.keep it up.all the best.

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