"Bear in mind that the wonderful things you learn in your schools are the work of many generations, produced by enthusiastic effort and infinite labor in every country of the world. All this is put into your hands as your inheritance in order that you may receive it, honor it, add to it, and one day faithfully hand it to your children. Thus do we mortals achieve immortality in the permanent things which we create in common." - Albert Einstein

Wednesday, July 10, 2013

Reading: On-Screen Versus In-Print

Alex Reichert, a recent graduate from UCLA enumerates the benefits of reading in a blog article on the Huffington Post, "The Reasons I Became an Avid Reader":
  • Improve your brain function
  • Discover an untapped passion lurking in your soul
  • Build your vocabulary
  • Relieve stress
  • Learn how to eloquently and articulately organize and express thoughts
  • Increase reading comprehension skills
  • Learn about the world
  • Learn about human nature
  • Learn from history
  • Reusability
The above is a personal list but I am sure a majority would agree that reading is indeed very important. With technology apparently disrupting education and paving better routes for learning, it is disconcerting to read a recent report from the National Literacy Trust in UK, "Children’s on-screen reading overtakes reading in print". At first glance at the title, one gets the impression that technology is indeed revolutionizing learning as children are now reading more from screens rather than books. But the details are troubling:
The research examines the influence of this technology on children’s reading abilities and their enjoyment of reading. It found those who read daily only on-screen are nearly twice less likely to be above average readers than those who read daily in print or in print and on-screen (15.5% vs 26%). Those who read only on-screen are also three times less likely to enjoy reading very much (12% vs 51%) and a third less likely to have a favourite book (59% vs 77%)... ...We are concerned by our finding that children who only read on-screen are significantly less likely to enjoy reading and less likely to be strong readers. Good reading skills and reading for pleasure are closely linked to children’s success at school and beyond. We need to encourage children to become avid readers, whatever format they choose. 
The above is simply a preliminary announcement of the National Literacy Trust on this survey of almost 35,000 children and young people aged eight to sixteen in the UK. There is a forthcoming report that presents the results of this survey. It would be interesting to find out how much it has changed from the previous survey in 2012 which had the following table, for example:

Captured from http://www.literacytrust.org.uk/assets/0001/4543/Young_people_s_reading_FINAL_REPORT.pdf







2 comments:

  1. Very informative post. In my opinion, traditional way of learning such as learning from books is very important. Books can be attained by almost every people from all walks of life, compared to e-books or other gadgets where only fortunate people can attain. If you have spare time, please visit our website http://talkshop.ph/ . It caters to every people who are interested in Grammar Mastery and Personality development. Thanks and more power to your site!

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  2. Cristopher Ian D. CapistranoMay 13, 2014 at 9:43 PM

    This is a very good read. Very informative indeed. Please visit our website http://www.aplus-is.com/ for Spanish, English and Mandarin language proficiency.

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